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Scuba Diving Pictures Main Page


This is Vancouver Island's largest collection of digital images for scuba diving sites.
If you would like to see these web pages to continue please remember to check out some of the Google Ads.
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green spacer Alberthead Lagoon in Metchosin, B.C.
Bear Cove in Port Hardy, B.C.
Bob's Spot in the Plumper Island Group, B.C.
Braemar Ave in North Saanich, B.C.
Breakwater Island near Gabriola Pass, B.C.
Browning Passage near Port Hardy, B.C.
Browning Wall near Port Hardy, B.C.
China Creek near Port Alberni, B.C.
Clover Point in Victoria, B.C.
Copper Cliffs near Campbell River, B.C.
Daphne Islet near Brentwood Bay
Deep Cove near Sidney, B.C.
Discovery Island near Victoria, B.C.
Dolphin Beach near Nanoose Bay, B.C.
Elliot's Beach Park in Ladysmith, B.C.
Five Fathom near Port Hardy, B.C.
Forest Island (north end) near Sidney, B.C.
GB Church [ship to reef] near Sidney, B.C.
Gowland Point on South Pender Island, B.C.
Henderson Point near Sidney, B.C.
Madrona Point in Nanaimo, B.C.
Maple Bay near Duncan, B.C.
McKenzie Bight near Victoria, B.C.
McNeill Point aka Kitty Islet in Victoria, B.C.
Neck Point in Nanaimo, B.C.
Northeast Pearse Wall, Telegraph Cove, B.C.
Ogden Point in Victoria, B.C.
Porteau Cove Marine Park, B.C.
Port McNeil, B.C.
Rocky Point in Nanaimo, B.C.
Row & Be Damned near Campbell River, B.C.
Saltery Bay near Powell River,B.C.
Saxe Point in Esquimalt, B.C.
Sidney, B.C.
Ten Mile Point in Victoria, B.C.
Wall Beach near Nanoose Bay, B.C.
Whytecliff Park near Vancouver, B.C.
Willis Point near Sidney, B.C.

International
Kailua-Kona on the Big Island of Hawaii, USA
Kaui - an Island of Hawaii, USA
Aquatic but Non-Marine Life
Vancouver Island, B.C.
Scuba Diving Pictures from Ogden Point in Victoria, B.C. Canada
These are medium quality jpegs. But I have the RAW images as well.
Email tjfidler@telus.net
Directions to the Dive Site located at the bottom of the page.
Type of dive: shore dive for the most part, but the far end would be better as a boat dive near the light house at the end of the pier.
Rating for this dive site:
Parking: lots of park but need to pay, space for thirty plus vehicles
Boat ramp: none
Ease of entry: 7/10 as parking is close to water, but getting up and down granite blocks can be challenging. The barnacles can be dangerous.
You can also enter the water by the beach and for some people this would be the best choice.[Wheel chair access: Not really]
Abundance of life: 8/10 one of the best for Victoria, narrow band of kelp along the break-water in the summer and fall
Accommodations:  There are several places in Victoria, or even Esquimalt, that you could find lodging at. Hotels, Inns, and Motels.
Attractions: the granite blocks that make up the break water are home to lots of life and add area for life
Bottom and depth: can get past 90 feet [27 metres] at the end of the pier.
Facilities: Dive shop, coffee shop, bathroom,
Hazards/Obstacles: The agae on the granite blocks can be slippery, and climbing up and down the blocks is somewhat challenging
Sensitivity to tide/current: best to dive here at slack tide if you want to swim far, but if staying close then tide is not much of an issue
Terrain: granite blocks, with sandy bottom and some rock at bottom of blocks below the surface
Tides, transportation and weather: Fisheries and Oceans Canada Tide Page., BC Ferries Schedule and Sailings. , The Weather Network

If you like these pages, and wish this web site to continue, please remember to check out some of the Google Ads.
Just clicking on the ads helps pay for the web site.

The following images are thumbnails. If you click on them a larger image will open up and the picture will take up most of your screen. Again these are medium qualifty jpegs. Higher quality images can be purchased directly from me via paypal using my email address tjfidler@telus.net And many of these photos can be found for sale on Cafepress through the Calendar link and Photo CD link . As well some of these can be found as posters via Cafepress, and some of these ocean life photographs are available as widescreen backgrounds via the widescreen link immediately below some of the photographs.

The Ogden Point Breakwater

Ogden Point Breakwater

A few people have already asked me about "What is that pink stuff on the rocks in some of the pictures?" Well, they're usually Pink Rock Crust (aka Encrusting Coralline Algae) or in some cases might even be Encrusting Hydrocorals and are very common on the rock surfaces. They're eaten by a variety of animals - apparently as a good source of calcium.

Links to the various groups of organisms:
Cephalopods, Chitons, Crustaceans, Fish, Mollusks, Nudibranchs, Sea Anemones, Sea Cucumbers & Echinoderms, Sponges, Tunicates, Worms, Miscellaneous

Cephalopods

Octopus
Octopus
Giant Pacific Octopus [Enteroctopus dolfeini] - hiding under kelp - poor visibility
today. 1 of 3 images of the same animal. ( July 2, 2006)
Giant Pacific Octopus [Enteroctopus dolfeini] 2 of 3 images of the same animal.
( July 2, 2006)
Octopus

Giant Pacific Octopus - 3 of 3 images of the same animal. ( July 2, 2006)

Chitons

Giant Pacific Chiton or Gumboot Chiton
Black Katy Chiton
Pacific Giant or Gumboot Chiton - about a foot long. (February 14, 2006) Black Katy Chiton (?) - about 4 inches long.  (February 11, 2006)
Gumboot Chiton
Chitons
Gumboot Chiton with camouflage and other critters living on it like an island.
Shrimp and small hermit crabs. As well as "red algae." About 12 inches long.
(August 27, 2006)
Two more colourful chitons. The larger one is about 4 inches long.(August 27, 2006)
This photo also appears on the marine-life calendar 2009 for Mollusks of the Pacific
Northwest
. North America 2009 Calendar v01
Gumboot Chiton - possibly laying eggs
Gumboot Chiton - spawning sperm
Giant Gumboot Chiton ~ 12 inches [30 cm] long. It appears to be giving of a string
of eggs. In the next image, a male appears to be giving off sperm. (Mar 5, 2009)
Giant Gumboot Chiton ~ 12 inches [30 cm] long. If you look at the right end of this
one it appears to be giving off sperm. (Mar 5, 2009)
Chiton - mollusk

Chiton ~ 3 inches [7.5 cm] long.


If you like these pages, and wish this web site to continue, please remember to check out some of the Google Ads. Just clicking on the ads helps pay for the web site.
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Crustaceans

Unknown Hermit
Northern Kelp Crab 01
Hermit Crab - Name? ( March 18, 2006) Northern Kelp Crab ( January 14, 2006)
Juvenile
Juvenile
Juvenile Puget Sound King Crab [Lopholithodes mandtii] (February 11, 2006) Juvenile Puget Sound King Crab [Lopholithodes mandtii] (February 11, 2006)
Juvenile
Adult
Juvenile Puget Sound King Crab [Lopholithodes mandtii] ~ 3 inches [7.5 cm]
wide. (February 11, 2006)
Adult Puget Sound King Crab [Lopholithodes mandtii] ~ 12 inches [30cm] wide.
(February 11, 2006)
Teenager
Teenager
"Teenager" Puget Sound King Crab [Lopholithodes mandtii] ~ 8 inches [20 cm]
wide (February 14, 2006) This image also appears on the ocean-life calendar 2009
for Crustaceans of the Pacific Northwest. North America 2009 Calendar v01.
For a wide screen version click on this link.
"Teenager" Puget Sound King Crab [Lopholithodes mandtii] ~ 8 inches [20 cm]
 wide. (February 14, 2006)
Eyes
Blue Claws
Hermit Crab ~ 5 inches [12.5 cm] with the snail shell. (February 11, 2006) Foliate Kelp Crab - not sure why blue claws. Normally white. (February 11, 2006)
Defensive
Green Camo
Moss [?] Crab ~ 4 inches wide across the arms. It raised up its arms as I
approached it. Brave little critter. (February 5, 2006)
Moss [Loxorhynchus crispatus] or Sharp Nosed Crab ~ 4 inches [10 cm] wide.
  (February 14, 2006)
Click on this link for a widescreen version of this photograph.
Young Butter
Old Butter
Young Umbrella Crab [Cryptolithodes sitchensis] and Scaly Head Sculpin to the left.
(February 14, 2006)
This image also appears on the ocean-life calendar 2009 for
Crustaceans of the Pacific Northwest. North America 2009 Calendar v01
Adult Umbrella Crab [Cryptolithodes sitchensis] ~ 5 inches [12.5 cm] wide.
 (February 14, 2006)
These are fairy common here, but you do have to look for them.
Orange Hermit
Sponge Hermit
Orange Hermit Crab ~ 6 inches [15 cm] wide for the snail shell. (March 18, 2006)
An appropriate name for this hermit crab. And they are fairly common here.
Hermit Crab wearing Sponge ~ 6 inches [15 cm] wide along the sponge.
(February 14, 2006)
Claw
Orange Hermit Crab wearing Sponge
Orange Hermit Crab ~ 6 inches [15 cm] across the shell.  (March 18, 2006) Orange Hermit Crab wearing Sponge (February 14, 2006)
Heart Crab top view
Heart Crab side view
Heart Crab [Phyllolithodes papillosus] ~ 4 inches [10 cm] across main body.
(April 8, 2006)
Heart Crab [Phyllolithodes papillosus] (April 8, 2006)
Heart Crab hiding
Sharp Nosed Crab
Heart Crab [Phyllolithodes papillosus] (April 8, 2006) Sharp Nosed Crab [Scyra acutifrons] ~ 5 inches [12.5 cm] wide across arms.
 (May 13, 2006)
Decorator Crab
Mating Decorator Crabs
Decorator Crab (May 13, 2006) Two Decorator Crabs mating (May 13, 2006)
Slender Crab
Slender Crab hiding in sand
Slender Crab (?) ~ 5 inches [12.5 cm] wide, eating a small jelly fish.
"Now you see me." (May 13, 2006)
Same crab as the one on the left of this image. "Now you don't." (May 13, 2006)
Giant Acorn Barnacle
Cancer Crab
Giant Acorn Barnacle - yes related to crabs. Arms about 4 inches. (May 13, 2006)
This photo also appears on the marine-life calendar 2009 for Crustaceans of the
Pacific Northwest
. North America 2009 Calendar v01
Cancer Crab aka Pygmy Rock Crab [Cancer oregonensis] hiding in Giant Acorn
 Barnacle shell (June 6, 2006)
Sharp Nosed Crab
Decorator Crab
Sharp Nosed Crab [Scyra acutifrons] ~ 6 inches [15 cm] wide across the legs.
 (June 6, 2006)
Decorator Crab ~ 5 inches [12.5 cm] wide across the legs. (June 6, 2006)
Hermit Crab
Slender Crab
Hermit Crab leaning against a larger crabs arm (June 6, 2006)
Slender Crab (July 2, 2006)
Sharp Nosed Crab
Decorator Crab
Sharp Nosed Crab [Scyra acutifrons] ~ 8 inches [20 cm] long.
Sharp Nosed crabs are very common here and usually easy to spot.
(August 27, 2006)
Decorator Crab on field of Fused Orange Social Tunicates (August 27, 2006)
Sharp Nosed Crab
Bering Hermit Crab wearing a sponge
Sharp Nosed Crab [Scyra acutifrons] ~ 9 inches [22.5 cm] wide across the arms.
 Common at this dive site. (Mar 5, 2009)
Bering Hermit Crab [] wearing a Sponge.
(May 13, 2009)
Helmet Crab - crustacean

Helmet Crab


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Fish

Wolf Eel 1
Wolf Eel 1
Wolf Eel (#1) These fish can be quite large. Up to 6 feet [2 m] long. (April 8, 2006)
[Anarrichthys ocellatus]
Wolf Eel (#1) This fish was kind enough to come more out of its den and I was able
to take a couple more pictures of it. (April 8, 2006)
[Anarrichthys ocellatus]
Wolf Eel 2
Wolf Eel 3
Wolf Eel (#2) These fish are fairly common here, with about six of them living at the
end of the break water, closer to the last bend. (April 8, 2006)
[Anarrichthys ocellatus]
Wolf Eel (#3) Some people think these fish look like muppets. (April 8, 2006)
This photo can be found on the marine-life calendar 2009 for Fishes of the
Pacific Northwest
. North America 2009 Calendar v01
[Anarrichthys ocellatus]
Kelp Greenling 01 Ling Cod 01 Dark
Kelp Greenling [Hexagrammos decagrammus] ~ 18 inches [45 cm] long. These
 fish are common here, but they are somewhat camera shy.
( January 14, 2006)
Ling Cod ~ 3 feet [1 m] long. These fish are very common here, but not always
willing to stay still long enough to have their pictures taken. ( January 14, 2006)
Scaly Head Sculpin
Close up of Scaly Head
Scaly Head Sculpin ~ 5 inches [12.5 cm] long.  Some back scatter in image can be
seen in this image. They are the white spots. These fish are very common here.
(September 3, 2006
Scaly Head Sculpin ~ 5 inches [12.5 cm] long.  These fish range in color from dark
red to pink. (February 14, 2006)
Head shot of Scaly Head Sculpin
Sculpin
Scaly Head Sculpin ~ 5 inches [12.5 cm] long.  (February 14, 2006) Some kind of Sculpin (February 14, 2006)
Longfin
Longfin
Longfin Sculpin ~ 6 inches [15 cm] long. Quite common here. (March 18,  2006)
Longfin Sculpin (March 18,  2006)
This image also appears on the ocean-life calendar 2009 for Underwater Life of the
Pacific Northwest
. North America 2009 Calendar v03
Painted Greenling
Painted Greenling
Painted Greenling (April 8,  2006) Painted Greenling (April 8,  2006)
Mosshead Warbonnet
Mosshead Warbonnet
Mosshead Warbonnet (April 8, 2006) Mosshead Warbonnet (April 8, 2006)
Vermilion Rockfish
Canary Rockfish
Vermilion Rockfish - not a good picture - Example of Backscatter (May 13, 2006) Canary Rockfish [Sebastes pinniger] - not a good picture - Example of
 Backscatter (May 13, 2006)
Grunt Sculpin
Canary Rockfish
Grunt Sculpin ~ 4 inches [10 cm] long. Its always a treat to watch these fish crawl
on the bottom. They can barely swim. (June 6, 2006)
Canary Rockfish [Sebastes pinniger] - based on the scale pattern I think this is the
 same fish as above. But this is about a month later in time. (June 6, 2006) There
 were about six of these fish but they would not stay still to have their picture taken.
 But they kept swimming by me.
Sculpin
Sculpin
Sculpin of some kind ~ 5 inches [12.5 cm] long for this fish. (July 2, 2006) Sculpin of some kind ~ 5 inches [12.5 cm] long for this fish (July 2, 2006)
Sculpin
Ling Cod
Sculpin of some kind (July 2, 2006) The sculpins in general seem to be curious
and sometimes come to me. But after a while get bored or scared of the flash. And
leave like most fish do. But sometimes they come even closer. About 4 inches
[10 cm] long.
Ling Cod - braver than most as they usually run away (July 2, 2006)
Grunt Sculpin
Grunt Sculpin
Grunt Sculpin ~ 4 inches [10 cm] long. (July 2, 2006)
This photo can be found on the marine-life calendar 2009 for Underwater Life of the
PacificNorthwest. North America 2009 Calendar v01
Grunt Sculpin ~ 4 inches [10 cm] long. These fish crawl for the most part. They can
barely swim in terms of speed. (July 2, 2006)
Black Eyed Goby
Longfin Sculpin
Black Eyed Goby ~ 4 inches [10 cm] long. These fish are fairly common here and
can usually be found where the granite blocks meet the sand. (July 2, 2006)
Longfin Sculpin and pink Blue-Lined Chiton below it (July 2, 2006)
Copper Rockfish

Copper Rockfish [Sebastes caurinus] ~ 14 inches [35 cm] long. Common at this
 dive site. But hard to get them to stay still for a picture.
Video of some Copper Rockfish just swiimming around. Its not that easy to get
a decent digital still image, as not only does the fish have to stay still but the water
qualilty has to be good as well.

Quillback Rockfish
Video of a Kelp Greenling female fish just swimming and going to hide in the sea
grass beds at Ogden Point. These fish are quite common here, but they don't usually
stay still long enough to have a picture taken. And on this day the water quality was
too poor for a still digital image.
Quillback Rockfish [] ~ 14 inches (35 cm) long.
Quite common at this scuba diving site.
Fish with sea lice attached to its stomach

Fish with a really big sea louse [lice] attached to it. Big compared to the fish.


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Molluscs (excluding Nudibranchs, Chitons & Cephalopods)

Group of Scallops
Group of Scallops
Scallops ~ 4 inches [10 cm] wide. (May 13, 2006)
This photo also appears on the marine-life calendars for Mollusks [v01] &
Underwater Life [v01] of the Pacific Northwest . North America 2009 Calendars
Scallops ~ 4 inches [10 cm] wide. They are usually covered in sponge that ranges
in colour from yellow to pink. They are quite common at the end of the granite break
water.(May 13, 2006)
Group of Scallops
Scallop
Scallops ~ 4 inches [10 cm] wide. (May 13, 2006) Scallops ~ 4 inches [10 cm] wide. (May 13, 2006)
Scallops
Scallop
Scallops ~ 4 inches [10 cm] wide. (May 13, 2006) Scallops ~ 4 inches [10 cm] wide. (May 13, 2006)
Scallop
Scallop
Scallops ~ 4 inches [10 cm] wide. (May 13, 2006) Scallops ~ 4 inches [10 cm] wide. (May 13, 2006)
Scallop

Scallop with odd sponge covering and a small Hermit Crab  (June 6, 2006)
This image also appears on the ocean-life calendar 2009 for Underwater Life of the
Pacific Northwest
. North America 2009 Calendar v03



Nudibranchs (Sea Slugs)  & Snails

Yellow Margin
Giant White
Yellow Margin Dorid (March 18. 2006)
Giant White Dorid (February 14, 2006)
2 Nudes
California Berthella
California Berthella [Berthella californica] and tiny shrimp riding one of them.
(February 14, 2006)
California Berthella [Berthella californica] ~ 6 inches [15 cm] long. Sitting beside a
Swimming scallop. (May 13, 2006)
California Berthella
White Lined Dorid
California Berthella [Berthella californica] ~ 6 inches [15 cm] long.  (July 2, 2006) White Lined Dorid (July 2, 2006)
Triton and Dorid
Dorids laying eggs
Hairy Triton and 4 Dorids [type of Nudibranch] below it (July 2, 2006)
This image also appears on the ocean-life calendar 2009 for Mollusks Life of the
Pacific Northwest
. North America 2009 Calendar v01
Close up of Dorids from previous image (July 2, 2006)
Clown Dorid
Diamond Back Tritonia
Clown Dorid [Triopha catalinae] - about 6 inches long. (August 27, 2006) Diamond Back Tritonia - about 6 inches long. (August 27, 2006)
This photo also appears on the marine-life calendar 2009 for Mollusks of the
Pacific Northwest
. North America 2009 Calendar v01
Clown Dorid
Clown Dorid
Clown Dorid [Triopha catalinae] - about 6 inches long. (August 27, 2006) Clown Dorid [Triopha catalinae] - about 6 inches long. (August 27, 2006)
Cockerells Dorid - nudibranch

Cockerell's Dorid [Laila cockerelli] ~ 2 inches [5 cm] long. (Mar 5, 2009)

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Sea Cucumbers & Starfish

Sea Cucumber 01 Tiger
Sea Cucumber ( January 14, 2006) Striped Sunstar ~ 3 feet [1 m] wide. These starfish are fairly common here, and are
quite large. (February 14, 2006)
Creeping Petal Sea Cucumber
Creeping Petal Sea Cucumber
Creeping Pedal Sea Cucumber - Open (April 8, 2006) Creeping Pedal Sea Cucumber - Closed (April 8, 2006)
Creeping Pedal
Creeping Petal Sea Cucumber
Slipper Sea Cucumber ~ 8 inches [20 cm] long including the petal portion.
(March 18, 2006)
Creeping Pedal Sea Cucumber (May 13, 2006)
Orange Sea Cucumber
Orange Sea Cucumber
Orange Sea Cucumber - closed (February 14, 2006) Orange Sea Cucumber - partially open (February 14, 2006)
Orange Sea Cucumber
Orange Sea Cucumber
Orange Sea Cucumber ~ 12 inches [30 cm] wide. (May 13, 2006) Orange Sea Cucumber ~ 10 inches [25 cm] tall. (May 13, 2006)
Rose Star Fish
Spiny Pink Sea Star
Rose Star Fish ~ 8 inches [20 cm] wide. (May 13, 2006) Spiny Pink Sea Star (May 13, 2006)
Striped Sunstar
Striped Sunstar
Striped Sunstar - about 3 feet [1 m] across (August 27, 2006) Striped Sunstar - about 3 feet [1 m] across (August 27, 2006)
Leather Starfish

Leather Star []


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Sea Anemones & Jellyfish ( Cnidarians )

Red Beaded Anemone 01 Sea Anemone
Red Beaded Anemone ( January 14, 2006) Fish Eating Anemone or Painted Anemone (?) (March 18, 2006)
Sea Anemone
Sea Anemone
Fish Eating Anemone (?) (March 18, 2006) Fish Eating Anemone (?) (March 18, 2006)
Tube Dwelling Anemone
Tube Dwelling Anemone
Tube Dweling Anemone and a Spiny Pink Star (May 13, 2006) Tube Dweling Anemone  (June 6, 2006)
Sea Blubber
Sea Blubber
Sea Blubber or Lion's Mane - about 12 inches (30 cm) across (May 13, 2006) Sea Blubber - same animal from different view (May 13, 2006)
Zoanthid Anemone
Rose Anemone
Zoanthid Anemones (June 6, 2006)
Rose Anemone (September 3, 2006)
Giant Plumose Anemones  - Metridium farcimen
Green Anemone - not the giant variety
Giant Plumose Anemones [Metridium farcimen] just under 3 feet [1 m] tall for this
group of these animals. They are quite common here between dive marker 2 and 3.
(May 13, 2009)
Green Anemone [?] ~ 9 inches [22.5 cm] wide. They seem to be only found in the
shallows at this scuba dive site. And thus you need to dive at high tide to see these
animals and a few others that are near the rocks on the beach at the break water.
Pink Tipped Anemones

Pink Tipped Anemones [?] ~ 2 inches [5 cm] wide.


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Worms

Tube Worm
Tube Worm
Calcareous Tube Worm (September 3, 2006)
Calcareous Tube Worm (September 3, 2006)

Ogden Point

You will more likely want to dive along the break water that makes up Ogden Point. It is located near the corner of Dallas Road and Dock Street in Victoria, British Columbia [BC], Canada.

If you want to print out a map you can user either:

Google Maps and just type in: Dock Street Victoria BC

MapQuest then for Ogden Point you can enter Dock Street for the Address, Victoria for the City, BC for the State/Province. Switch to the Aerial View [An option at the top-right of the screen.] and you will actually see the break water itself.

Copyright © 2006 - 2010 by Terrance J. Fidler. All rights reserved.

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